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Historical Newspapers   OREGON

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COQUILLE CITY HERALD   Coquille, Oregon
[amended Sept-Nov 2008;  needs keywords]  


FEBRUARY 3, 1885  


Np80 CCH February 3, 1885 
First Steps.  [head, centered, bold, larger than text; medium-wide margins]
   ____
  Hush!  The baby stands alone---
    Hold your breath and watch him,
  Now he takes a step – just one---
    Wavers, stops – quick, catch him!
  Courage!  Life’s first step will cost’
    Now again he’s trying---
  One, two – three!  He walks, almost,  [no cap on he]
    Trembling, stumbling, crying.
[space]
  One, two, three –Oh! He will walk [no cap on he]
    Now, before we know it;
  Hear his sweet-voiced baby talk,
    Little bird, or poet!
  Prattling, toddling, there he goes,
    Stepping off so proudly---
  Turning in his untaught toes,
    Pleased – then laughing loudly.
[space]
  There lies baby on the floor,
  Sprawling, rolling, creaming!
  Are life’s first attempts so poor?
    Baby was but dreaming
  When he felt so bold and strong;
    Gladly now he’s clinging
  To the one whose soothing song
    Back his smile is bringing.
[space]
  Kiss cured [sic], the little man
    Brave again as ever,
  {Ne’er such pluck since world began!)
     Makes his best endeavor.
  Walks right off – the darling pet---
    Rush now to caress him!
  Come what will of first steps yet,
      All good angels bless him!  +

Np80 CCH February 3, 1885 
Mode of Curing Hams. [the rest not copied]
=

Np81 CCH February 3, 1885 
IS IT TRUE?  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium margins.]
     ____
     The aged Victor Hugo, the reverend poet of France, now past fourscore, knows nothing of the joyless gloom of Ingersoll and Bradlaugh [sic] as they look beyond death.  His own words give but expression to his sense of immortality:  [sic]
     “I feel in myself the future life.  I am like a forest which as been more than once cut down.  The new shoots are stronger and livelier than ever.  I am rising, I know, toward the sky.  The sunshine is on my head.  The earth gives me a generous sap, but heaven lights me with the reflection of unknown worlds.  You say the soul is nothing but the resultant of bodily powers.  Why then is my soul more luminous when my bodily powers begin to fail?  Winter is on my head and eternal spring is in my heart.  Then  breathe, at this hour, the fragrance of the lilacs, the violets and the roses as at twenty years.  The nearer l approach the end, the plainer I hear around me the immortal symphonies of the worlds which invite me.  It is marvelous yet simple.  It is a family tale; and it is history.  For half a century I have been writing my thoughts in prose, verse, history, philosophy, drama, romance, tradition, satire, ode, song ---  I have tried all.  But I feel that I have not said the thousandth past that is in me.  “I have finished my day’s work, but I cannot say I have finished my life,.  [sic]  My day’s work will begin the next morning;  a tomb is not a blind alley;  it is a thoroughfare.  It closes in the twilight to open in the dawn.  I improve every hour because I love this world as my father-land [sic].  My monument is hardly above its foundation.  I would be glad to see it mounting and mounting forever.  The thirst for the infinities proves infinity.”  +

Np81 CCH February 3, 1885 
     The Quaker City has not been noted for the beauty of its women in this day only.  The pages of all its sedate history are bright with faces of pretty maidens and stately matrons.  Among the Revolutionary days none was more charming than gay, ill-starred Margaret Shippen.  Her family at that time was one of the most influential in the provinces, and it has continued to   give to Philadelphia a succession of sturdy, high-minded men and women, though her own life was clouded by suspicions of disloyalty.  She married Benedict when she was 18. She first met him in Philadelphia on his return from Canada loaded with honors, and her girlish fancy was captivated by his dashing manners and the splendor of his career.  Her family opposed the union, but she insisted on it, would have become his wife in spite of all opposition, but the barriers were at last removed.  She had been married about a year and just become a mother, when her husband committed the traitorous deed that will make his name despised through all time.  She was at West Point with her baby.  She was at once taken into custody and given into charge of General Hamilton and Aaron Burr to be conveyed to Philadelphia.  She was not permitted to remain in peace, however, even at the house of her father.  The indignation of the populace was at a fever heat, and the traitor’s young bride was ordered by the Provincial Council, then the governing body, to leave the colonies.  In vain her father, afterwards Chief-Justice [sic], pleaded for mercy, offered the largest security for her conduct; promised that she should receive no communications of any kind from any one [sic] through any but the public channels and under the closest scrutiny.  It was in vain.  The council would not modify its decree.  The young woman left for England, met her husband there and lived to be a good old age.  Some of their descendents have done distinguished service in the English army and navy and in the English Church.  –Philadelphia Letter in Chicago Tribune.  +
=

Np82-83 CCH February 3, 1885 
THE APACHES.  [head, bold, centered, smaller than text; medium-wide margins.]
     _______
     General Crook, in command of the Department of Arizona [sic], has made his annual report to the Commander of the Division of the Pacific, in which he says:  I have the honor to report that during the year just past the condition of military affairs in the Department of Arizona has been eminently satisfactory.  The last of the Chiricahua Apaches is now on the reservation, and, for the first time in the history of that fierce people, every member of the Apache tribe is at peace.
     Efforts were made early in the Spring to put the Chiricahuas at work for their own living.  They were allowed to select farming lands in the vicinity of Fort Apache, such seeds and farming implements as could be obtained were issued to them, and under the instruction of Captain Crawford, Third Cavalry, assisted by Lieutenant Britton Davis of the same regiment, ground was broken and farming begun.  The results have been such as to warrant the most hopeful anticipations.
                      GERONIMO AND CHATO.   [sub-head, centered, regular-not-bold, smaller than text; medium margins.]
     The two chiefs – Geronimo and Chato – who last year were our worst enemies – have this year made the greatest progress and possess the best tilled farms.  The other Apache bands continue to do excellently well, and with the exception of a few who did not receive seed in time or whose farming lands were injured by freshets, have produced large crops of vegetables and cereals, the surplus of which will be purchased for cash for the use of the military posts upon [sic] the Reservation.
     I regard this as one of the important features of any policy which has for its object the advancement of the savage beyond a state of vagabondage.  He must be made to work and he will do that with full heart [sic] only when he sees that he can always find a ready, [sic] cash market for the fruits of his labor.
              WHAT THE INDIANS RAISED.  [subhead, centered, regular-not-bold, smaller than text; narrowish margins.]
     Farming in Arizona demands much preliminary knowledge and entails much preliminary expense, irrigation is indispensable, and long and deep ditches must be excavated.  When besides this we have an inadequate provision of seed and farming implements – many of the Indians being compelled to plant with long sticks hardened in the fire, and to reap with ordinary case knives, some idea may be formed of the difficulties overcome   -- but, in spite of these difficulties, the following crops have been raised this season:  3,850,000 pounds of corn, 550.000 pounds of barley, 50,000 pounds of beans, 20,000 pounds of potatoes,  50,000 pounds of wheat, 200,000 pumpkins 50,000 watermelons, 40,000 muskmelons [sic], besides small quantities of onions, cabbages and pepper.
               WARRIORS AT WORK.  [subhead, centered, not-bold, smaller than text, medium margins.]
     The bands living in the vicinity of Fort Apache lost one-third of their crops by late Spring rains and frosts, while those living closer to the San Carlos Agency were even more unfortunate by reason of freshets in the Gila rivers [sic].
     Upon my reassignment to the command of this department, just two years ago, the Chiricahuas and many of the White mountain [sic] Apaches were on the warpath, and the others were mainly loafers and beggars, hanging about the agency for an occasional dole of rations.  Farming labor – indeed labor of any kind – was [sic] regarded as drudgery to be done if done at all, by squaws, but no stronger proof can be adduced [sic] of the anxiety of the Apaches to improve their condition than the fact that more than half the work of this year has been performed by men and boys.
         ENFRANCHISEMENT [sic] URGED.  [sub-head; centered, not-bold, smaller than text, narrowish margins.]
     It is not perhaps necessary to repeat the views held by me in previous reports upon all that relates to Indian management.  Years of practical experience with the savage under all possible circumstances have merely confirmed the theories formed and followed in my earlier service.  The Indian will never cease to be a nuisance and a terror until he be enfranchised, but it is not just to endow him with the ballot until he be competent to hold land in severalty [sic] and be taught how to utilize it for his own support.
     The facts cited in the case of the Apaches speak for themselves.  They demonstrate that with but little honest encouragement, this Indian will drop from the list of worthless idlers and relieve the government from the responsibility of caring for them.  +
=

Np84 CCH February 3, 1885 
[agric filler]  Ducks Are Profitable.  [M.  The rest not copied.]

Np84 CCH February 3, 1885 
     The Hungarian patriot Kossuth is not dead, as reported, but enjoys a hearty octogenarianism [sic].  What boy of forty years does not remember his Kossuth hat which prevailed when the great Magyar made his appeal to our republicanism [sic] in behalf of his outraged fatherland?  +

Np84 CCH February 3, 1885 
True As Gospel.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium-wide margins.]
     _______
     Medicine has cost the world more than bread and has killed more than it has cured.
     A lie is like a cat, it never comes to you in a straight line.
     A reputation for happiness wants not as much looking after as a reputation for honesty.
     When a man measures out glory for himself, he always heaps the measure.
     There are two kinds of men I do not want to meet when I am in a hurry, the man that I owe and men who owe me.
     The man who has not an enemy is really poor.
     Advice is like castor oil, easy to give, but dreadful uneasy [sic] to take.
     Laziness is like money, the more a man has of it the more he seems to want.
     Whenever a minister preaches a sermon that pleases the whole congregation, in nine cases out of ten he has preached a sermon that the Lord won’t endorse.
     Politeness never makes any blunders, it often gets snubbed but never gets beat.
     When you come across a man that neither flattery nor abuse will stimulate, let him alone, he has gone to seed.
     An idler is twice a thief, he not only steals his own time but hangs around and tries to steal yours.
    I never knew a man that lived on hope, but that he spent his old age at somebody else’s expence [sic].
     He who has nothing to do in this world but amuse himself has the hardest job on hand I know of.
     I never knew a man to brag of his money or his pedigree that had anything else to brag about.
     What a man gets for nothing he is very apt to value at just about what it cost him.  +
=

Np85 CCH February 3, 1885 
      [M.2008;  this is in the place where there’s usually a local editorial; but no ID on whether it is local or a national filler.]
The Land Question.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium margins.]
          ____
     What with the cholera in Europe, the general depression in business circles throughout the world, and the distress of the laboring element, the year 1884 closed on a memorable epoch.  European difficulties arise chiefly from excess and the great improvements in machinery.  Where a hundred men would find employment in harvesting in the old, [sic] times, [sic] improved machinery enables the farmer to dispense with, say ninety per cent [sic].   In other branches, machinery plays the same role, and it is folly to suppose that, with a constantly increasing population, the avenues of skilled labor will afford employment for all.  The land question will remain as the great problem to be solved – another “irrespressible [sic] conflict.”  In England, Ireland and Scotland, the great body of the land is held by a few titled individuals, whose only title to the land is founded on conquest – the doubtful right of the robber.  While agrarianism can never be accomplished without a violent and bloody revolution in those islands, it would be a great relief to the people to abolish the law of primogeniture, by which the land is entailed and retained in one family.
     Great quantities of good agricultural land are held for no other purpose than deer farms.
     In our own country we are free from those evils.  The question that must soon arise here is, how long with increasing emigration [sic] to our shores, and the gradual absorption [sic] of the land by the emigrants [sic] supplemented with the enormous grants to railways, and the purchase of vast tracts by capitalists, will it be before we will be compelled to give the matter an earnest consideration?  We are told of the time when the United States will possess and support 200,000,000 of human beings.  Granting that will be so, yet, [sic] the fact remains that the country is better able to support 150,000,000 comfortably, or 100,000,000 in approximate affluence.  To draw on the imagination for a highly colored picture of a future, a dense population, [sic] cannot endow the prospect with a parallelism of prosperity.  The greater the density, the greater the misery.  There will be no land for the landless then.  Looking at it in the interest of posterity, we cannot see where they will be benefited by it.  There will then be no necessity for pre-emption or homestead laws, as there is nothing to pre-empt.  The bloated aristocrat will then be on top, as he is in other less favored lands, at present, [sic] and the poor will be subjected to the toils of the spoiler.  This is the inevitable consequence proceeding from a density of population, and we may claim that we are not responsible for it.  In a measure that is true, and in a certain measure, false.  [sic]  Are we not accountable to posterity for the villainous waste of territory?  Are we not to be held responsible, and our memories detested for building up, [sic] a great landed aristocracy – the greatest the world has witnessed?  The few who are benefited become reckless, and the great majority who sleep in fancied security, are despoiled.  Let us give some thought to the land question while there is land enough left to make it an issue;  let us check the growing powers of the sordid land grabber [sic], then, [sic] we may earn the blessings of posterity, instead of that which now seems imminent – their illimitable execration [sic].  +
=

Np86 CCH February 3, 1885 
     There was an earthquake in San Francisco on the morning of Jan. 26th, at 1:35.  No damage reported.  [sic]  +

Np86 CCH February 3, 1885 
The Shoaling of Streams.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium-ish margins.]
              _____
     We were informed lately by a gentleman who is perfectly reliable, that a survey made some years ago showed that there was ten feet of water above Myrtle Point, where there is but five feet now, and less in some places.  The reason given for this alleged shoaling of the stream is the practice of cutting logs and then rolling the tops of such logs, or other trees that contain branches, into the stream.  This kind of timber is generally caught by the branches and held in place, obstructing the current and aiding the accumulation of debris;the [sic] consequence of which is, the stream becomes shoal.  As a remedy cannot be applied too soon, would it not be well to agitate the question of some law being enacted to prevent persons from rolling waste timber into the streams?  Now is the time to put a stop to this business.  Such timber can be burned and made to benefit the soil, and it appears foolish for people who live on the banks of a stream to be using measures calculated to obstruct its navigation.  +

Np86 CCH February 3, 1885 
     The Church music still illuminates the columns of our contemporary.  It is of a poor quality, but, [sic] if it pleases the Church and gratifies a vile auditory, we shall not complain.  It is tainted with that impure air to which we referred last week, and its tone has that discordance – that sameness which precludes the possibility of charming the family circle.  But what care we?
Though the Church be base, and the music
             vile,
  We can take it in with a winning smile.
A nasty note contains no cunning.
  Nor is it worth the name of punning.
Our pity is unalloyed with scorn;
  So, if it gives you pleasure, toot your horn.   [first line of poem is smaller than text, but rest of poem lines are even smaller]
     The Herald’s support of the bar improvement does not please you.  What are you going to do about it?  We can tell you of something better than abuse.  Let us know the amount of sugar it takes to produce those sweet strains, and the amount of oil to lubricate the organ, we may then conclude that the grinding is legitimate and the monkey compelled to dance and show his tail.  There is a saying extant that every man has his price.  As it would be folly to suppose that you find the organ and manipulate it gratis, let us know yours.  [sic]  +  [M. 2008.  The Church appears to be an oblique reference to a “political view”.]
=

Np87 CCH February 3, 1885 
Advice.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; wide margins.]
______
     Advice is abundant, and is frequently offered by those who need a trifle of it.  Being asked for advice in a certain case, we respond by giving an opinion on the folly of meddling advice.  We are neither a moral or a physical doctor.  There are always exceptional cases, but, [sic] that which includes private affairs cannot be so considered.  Newspapers are appealed to for advice or information on manifold subjects.  Where they are competent to deal with the matter, they will use discretion; but, there is no known rule why the average editor would be better fitted to cope with questions in dispute than any other intelligent citizen.  We speak from our experience in such matters in this State.  We have noticed the predilection of many newspaper men [sic] in offering advice on matters with which they were totally ignorant.  Their praise is oft-times naught but base adulation; our opinions are as spontaneous as mushroons [sic], and generally less tangible.  If instead of an assumption of authority, they would offer their opinions for what they are worth, their [sic] would be less deceit propagated.  There is something sublimely ridiculous in any person assuming a position superior to his or her peers, and nowhere is the disease so prevalent as it is with the newspaper.
     In the present instance, we have no advice to offer; and, [sic] in offering this opinion our reason will be observed for declining the request.  +

Np87 CCH February 3, 1885 
     The British barque Cowden Low [sic] from Newcastle, England, for San Francisco, was burned at sea, 450 miles south of that place, on January the 19th.  The crew were picked up by the French barque Leopold and Marie, which arrived in San Francisco on the 29th ult.  +
=

Np88 CCH February 3, 1885 
Carrying Concealed Weapons.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium-narrow margins]
              _______
     Mr. Editor:  Seeing an article in your paper of the 27th, also a bill introduced in the legislature by Hon. J. H. Roberts, on the subject of carrying concealed weapons, allow me sufficient space for an opinion on that matter.  Now, if it is wrong to carry concealed weapons in the absence of any law of restraint, by virtue of that unwritten law which prompts us to condemn the practice in the interest of the peace of society, it must be wrong to license it.  If it is an evil, no law can make it respectable or strip it of the danger by which the carrying of concealed weapons is accompanied.  Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the criminal classes – the burglars, murderers and desperadoes [sic] that infest society, pay no attention to such laws, but carry weapons to enable them to succeed in their career of crime, therefore, the peaceable, well disposed [sic] person who will not carry a weapon, in consideration of the truism before stated – that it is equally wrong, is not only left at the mercy of the secret assassin, but he wil be subjected to danger from a new element which delights in the carrying of fire-arms [sic], and which will avail itself of the privilege of law to do so.  If it is wrong to carry concealed weapons, no law can make it right; the position is untenable.
                                                      Justice.  +  [M. 2008.  A pen name]

Np88 CCH February 3, 1885 
INCORPORATION.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium margins.]
         ____
     In answer to some remarks that were made to us with reference to whether a community can inclose [sic] the private property of an individual, situated outside the limits, inside of which they had intended to fix their boundaries originally, and procure an act of incorporation, we offer the following, which ma, or may not be correct:  The boundaries of the original act of incorporation of the town of Marshfield extended to the coal bank slough [sic], inclosing [sic] the property of Dean & Co. 
     We are of the opinion that that firm [sic] objected to the Marshfielders spreading the wings of their act of incorporation over their property, and that their objections were sustained.  To quote the language of Leland Standford [sic]:  “The essence of ownership is control.”  There would be no use in investing in property if your neighbor could take it away from you, notwithstanding the excuse that you will be remunerated.  Most generally property holders are benefited by having a town located close to them.  Whether it interferes with their right “to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,” we are not legally qualified to give an opinion.  +
=

Np89 CCH February 3, 1885 
The Oregon Legislature began balloting for U. S. senator on the 17th, with the following result:
     Senate – George, 4;  Slater, 11.  Boise, 1;  Hirsch, 4;  Johnson, 3;  Kelsay,2 [sic];  Moores, 1;  Applegate, 1;  Thayer, 1.
     House – George, 5;  Slater, 24;  Hirsch, 8;  Kelsay, 4;  Hare, 4;  Knight, 1; Boise, 4;  Johnson, 4;  Failing 3 [sic];  Williams, 2.  +

Np89 CCH February 3, 1885 
Harbor Improvement.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium margins.]
         _______
    The old enmity that existed or was said to exist on the Columbia river and that section of the Willamette which includes Portland, against the improvement of the harbors in Southern Oregon, is no so fierce as in olden times [sic]; but, the same element of jealousy still exists, while it seems to be confined to the ports which are now being improved in the southern district.  We were reminded of this in being told of the difficulty encountered with a few ignorant individuals on Coos bay in referent to signing a memorial to Congress for such improvement.  We say ignorant, and will proceed to demonstrate the truth of the assertion.  In the first place, the bars at the mouths of Coos bay, the Umpqua and Coquille are dangerous to life and property.  This being an acknowledged fact, the next thing to be considered is the remedy, and this can only be obtained by petitions to congress for aid.  Now, any person who offers to obstruct such measures, no matter from what cause – be it jealousy or an inherited meanness of disposition, is not only ignorant, but an avowed enemy of society.
     No doubt exists of there being men on Coos bay, who opposed any improvement because it interfered with their selfish views --  their rapid aggrandizement and tendency toward despotic control would be curtailed, hence, [sic] their opposition.  Again, there are others who calculate upon the advantage it would be to their interest if the Coquille river could be made tributary to Coos bay.  The position is an absurd one to assume, when the resources of the two sections and the immense amount of territory drained by the Coquille, are taken into consideration.  When the water shed [sic] of the Coquille and its immense bodies and variety of timber are taken into account, and its coal lands receive the attention they deserve, it will not be found occupying a secondary position with regard to Coos bay, but quite the reverse.
     The people of the Coquille have always favored the measures for improvement of Coos bay; therefore, we hold it to be axiomatic that those citizens of that place, who oppose our efforts to obtain a good bar, or who oppose any improvement for the better protection of life and property, are enemies to the well being [sic] of society and should be so considered.
     It has been said by some of those persons that they could see no good in such improvements.  Of course, where jealousy is the principle cause for depriving a person of a sense of justice to his neighbor, he cannot be expected to exert himself in the interest of fair play; nevertheless, the spirit displayed in such case is a concomitant [sic] of ignorance.
    When we consider the amount of good accomplished by our small appropriation, the ignorance of the obstructionist becomes as transparent as glass.  +
=

Np90 CCH February 3, 1885 
A Life on the Ocean Wave.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium-narrow margins.]
               ___
      Such a life may be very well to sing about; as, theories are often spread before the kind, which, in contemplation, [sic] present a beautiful picture.  But, a practical realization of a life on the ocean wave would strip the gloss from a vivid imagination, and blow sentimentality to the winds.  People will sing – seamen among the rest, and it follows that they must have something to sing about; but, while seamen are wont to sing, they find little time for melody in a sea life.  Before they embark, singing is indulged in as if to brave old Neptune; on their return to port, they sing as if rejoicing to be on shore again.  They seem to be a merry lot, but they are quite the reverse.  At sea, they are neither merry or sad – they are serious.  Eternal vigilance then, is not the price of liberty, it is the price of safety.  It is a most monotonous life at best; an extended and continuous panorama of sea and sky.  The incessant roll, and pitching of the ship; the tiresome flapping of the sails in calm weather, or fierce gusts of wind during a gale; the hoarse cry of “all hands shorten sail,” or that of “call the watch” is about all that breaks into the stillness of the scene.  +

Np90 CCH February 3, 1885 
GENERAL NEWS.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium-wide margins.]
[medium line-under]
     Leland Standford [sic] has been elected U. S. Senator from California, and Jones of Nevada re-elected.
     Massachusetts was the first of the thirteen original colonies to introduce slavery and Georgia the last.
     The hog cholera is raging in Nebraska to such an extent that the loss in one county will reach 70,000.
     The overhead wires in New York City, if in strait [sic] lines, would extend from San Francisco to London.
     The U. S. Senate has agreed to a bill that all material for the construction and repairs of government vessels shall be exclusively domestic.
     Cleveland is again in luck.  A wealthy democrat died some years ago and left $250,000 to the first democratic [sic] President who should be elected. 
     William Lenard [sic] died in providence [sic] Hospital, Seattle, aged 100 years and three months.  He had been married 76 years, and leaves a widow aged 97.

     There is a spirited contest going on among the European powers for the possession of Africa –[sic] Germany has taken a hand in the business, which seems to create considerable jealousy.  [all are +]
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Np91 CCH February 3, 1885 
    Commencing with Jun 1, 1885, the day will be reckoned at Greenwich Observatory, near London, England, as commencing at midnight, the hours being counted from one up to twenty-four.

Np91 CCH February 3, 1885 
Postoffice Department Statistics.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text, almost spans the column]
                  ____
     The report of Chief Inspector Sharp of the postoffice department [sic] shows during the past year 856 arrests were made by inspectors; 472 convictions were secured, and 163 cases are awaiting trial.  During the year, 672 out of 11,246,545 pieces of registered mail carried were lost.  Complaints were received of 20,377 ordinary letters, of which, 14,641 were said to contain inclosures [sic].  Investigation shows that 1,809 eventually reached their destination or were otherwise satisfactorily accounted for.  Four hundred and sixty-seven postoffices were robbed and 278 burned.  Twenty-three highway robberies of mail were reported and 24 postal cars were burned.  The miscellaneous cases investigated numbered 4,880.  They were of a confidential nature, and resulted in the collection from delinquent postmasters and others of money, fines and penalties aggregating $26,927. +
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Np92  CCH February 3, 1885 
TIMBER LAND NOTICE.  [head, centered, bold, same size as text; medium margins.]
U. S. Land Office, Roseburg, Oregon.
                               January 25, 1885.
NOTICE is hereby given that John C. Laird has applied to purchase the S W of N E 14 S E ¼ of N W ¼ and N ½ of S ¼ sec. 15 Township 28 South of range 13 west Will. Mer., under the act of June 3d for the sale of timber lands in the states of Oregon, Nevada and Territory Washington.  Any and all persons claiming any of the above described lands must file their claim with the register of the land office at Roseburg during the 60 days publication hereof and failing to do so their rights will be barred by statute,
                                                             Wm. F. Benjamin,
                                                                    Register.  +

Local Items.
Np92 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Dr. Steele has returned to Marshfield.  +

Np92 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Fred Webber [sic] was in town during the past week.  +

Np92 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Dr. G. Elgin was in town during the past week.  +

Np92 CCH February 3, 1885 
      C. H. Volkmar, [sic] came down from Myrtle Point yesterday.  +

Np92 CCH February 3, 1885 
     February the 1st commenced with warm wind and rain.  +

Np92 CCH February 3, 1885 
     H. J. [sic] Collier is building himself a residence on Fourth street.  +

Np92 CCH February 3, 1885 
     It is reported that our friend [Nate] Thrush lost a little child last week.  +
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Np93 CCH February 3, 1885 
     John Scott, of Parkersburg, was in town and left for Port Orford yesterday.  +

Np93 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Ren [sic] Smith, deputy sheriff, came over from Empire City, on business, Friday last.  +

Np93 CCH February 3, 1885 
     J. P. Stemler, of Dora, will accept our thanks for some eastern papers of a late date.  +

Np93 CCH February 3, 1885 
     George Bennett, Esq. of Bandon, paid us a visit on Thursday but he returned home the same day.  +

Np93 CCH February 3, 1885 
      District attorney J. W. Hamilton and Miss Ostrander, of Coos bay, were married at The Dalles, and are now at Salem.  +

Np93 CCH February 3, 1885 
     This town is out of onions, and the demand is great.  Some one could go extensively into the culture of onions here.  + 

Np93 CCH February 3, 1885 
     F. M. Murphy arrived at Texarkana, Arkansas, on the 9th ult.,  and found his father was dead. He sends his regards to his many friends here.  +

Np93 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Little Clarence Boyrie two years old, [sic] had the misfortune to have one of his fingers sawed almost in two, one day last week.  He was playing where his brother Edward was sawing a log and put his finger in the way of the saw.  +
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Np94 CCH February 3, 1885 
     We are on the “ragged edge” of anxiety for some more high toned [sic] compliments – such as will make appropriate reading for the home circle, and aid in the education of juvenility [sic].  +

Np94 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Croquet is in full blast.  This indicates more fully than a volume of assertions, to our readers in other states, the delightful weather we have had during the latter part of January.  +

Np94 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Matt Rickman, a Russian Finn, while proceeding to South slough, Coos bay, and in the vicinity of Rocky Point, shot himself accidentally with a rifle.  He lived about three hours after the accident occurred.  +

Np94 CCH February 3, 1885 
     In response to an inquiry as to our school facilities, we state that there are two schools here, conducted by able teachers, and the scholars are making good progress.  The attendance is fair, and we believe that more pupils can be accommodated.  +

Np94 CCH February 3, 1885 
     The Plaindealer says that an attempt has been made to burn Flook [sic] and Noble’s mill, a short distance south of Roseburg.  Miss Laura Jones discovered the fire and informed Mr. Flook, who ran to the mill and extinguished the flames.  It was the work of an incendiary.  +

Np94 CCH February 3, 1885 
   The name of the Douglas Independent has been changed to that of the Roseburg Review.  It presents a neat appearance and deserves a liberal support.  Douglas county contains population and wealth sufficient to make two papers profitable.  As the Independent, it was an old friend, therefore, we welcome it in its new dress, and wish it success.  +

Np94 CCH February 3, 1885 
     T. J. Perkins, of Parkersburg, was in town last week canvassing for Parmenter’s electric belts, etc.  An exhibit of this belt will convince anyone of its merits.  It is the only one we have seen that its influence could be plainly felt.  On being applied to the forehead, the operator can see the electric sparks flashing, and few can bear the shock when applied in that way.  +
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Np95 CCH February 3, 1885 
A BIT OF PHILOSOPHY.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; narrow-medium margins.]  [poem is much smaller type than that in regular items.]
(By LE GARCON)  [very small type; centered.]
              _______
  Two little mice were in a trap
    Strange are the ways of fate—
  No dread had they at their mishap,
    Whilst nibbling at the bait.
[space]
  Nor grief, nor anguish, did they feel,
    The prospect seemed to please;
  As, joyously, they made a meal
    On a small lump of cheese.
[space]
  Contented thus, why should they fret?
    They knew no cause for fear;
  Like laughing bipeds who forget,
    The end may be so near.
[space]
  Thus like the mice we are confined;
   To fate we all must bend;
  Prepare, enjoy, yet, be resigned,
    We know not when ‘twill end.
[space]
  Uncertainty!  Well, do not grieve;
    There’s much in life to please;
  The good and ill alike receive,
    And nibble at your cheese.  + 

Np95 CCH February 3, 1885   C. Douglas, of Randolph, is in town.  +

Np95 CCH February 3, 1885    February 3rd – cloudy, warm and frequent showers.  +
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Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Eugene O’Connell was in town last week on business.  +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Noah Leneve and family moved to Marshfield yesterday.  +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Judge J. H. and Abe L. Nosler paid this office a visit on Wednesday last.  +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Our citizens were planting potatoes and other early garden vegetables last week.  +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     There will be a necktie party at the church in Coquille City on Monday evening, Feb. 9th.  +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
    Old fashioned [sic] wharf rats have been introduced here by schooners that came here for cargoes.  +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     H. Virgil,of [sic] Empire City, arrived in town Thursday, with the intention of remaining some time.  +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Tax payers take notice.  The school tax will be delinquent on the 8th inst.  Pay up and save trouble.  +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     The wife of W. R. Getty, of Empire City, gave birth to twin sons last week, since which, [sic] one of them has died. +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Messrs. E. A. Anderson, F. Elrod and F. Haynes, came over from the bay, [sic] on business and passed through town on their return.  +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Senate Bill, [sic] No. 105, introduced by Siglin, authorizing county courts to incorporate towns, passed to second reading on the 23rd ultimo.  +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     Nosler’s butcher shop is adorned with a new brick chimney.  An addition to the appearance and an aid to the safety of the building.  +

Np96 CCH February 3, 1885 
     J. W. Wilson and his son, J. D. came down from Eckley with cattle and sheep for market on the 28th.  They took the sheep over to the bay.  +
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Np97 CCH February 3, 1885 
     J. C. Young, of Oakland, Douglas county, arrived here on the 29. [sic]  He is prospecting for beef cattle, and speaks highly of the stock in this neighborhood.  +

Np97 CCH February 3, 1885 
     J. B. Hunt has built a splendid walk up the hill from his place to the school house. A few more enterprising men like him are needed in this place.  +

Np97 CCH February 3, 1885 
     G. A. Brown, of Myrtle Point, was in town on Thursday.  He tells us that he would like to go into some business in this town, if he can see a favorable prospect.  We hope that he may succeed in finding an opening.  +

Np97 CCH February 3, 1885 
Scalp Bounty.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; wide margins.]
   _______
     The following is a bill introduced by Representative Roberts on the 16th of Jan., and which passed the second reading on the 23d.
     Section 1.  If a person takes or kills within the State any of the following noxious animals, he shall be entitled to receive from the treasurer of the county in which such animal was taken or killed, the following bounties:  For every wolf or coyote, three dollars;  for every black or brown bear, two dollars; for every lynx or wild-cat, one dollar.
      Sec. 2.  A person who kills a coyote or wolf, black or brown bear, lynx or wild-cat shall apply to any Justice of the Peace within the county that such animals were taken or killed, and present to him the scalp of such animal; and such Justice of the Peace shall examine such person under oath, and, if necessary, may examine other witnesses under oath; and, if he is satisfied that the animal to which it belonged, was killed or taken in the county, he shall give to such person a certificate thereof in the form prescribed in this Act.
     Sec. 3.  The County Treasurer, upon the presentation of a certificate signed and certified to by the Justice of the Peace to whom the head or heads of such animal was presented, shall, within six months from the presentation of such certificate, pay to claimant the bounty therein named, out of any moneys belonging to said county otherwise than school moneys.
     Sec. 4.  The Justice of the Peace to whom the scalp of the animal is presented, when a certificate is given, shall mark such scalp by cutting off both ears and destroying them.
     Sec. 5.  If any person takes a coyote or wolf, or panther, black or brown bear, lynx or wild-cat out of a trap, thereby to defraud the owner of such rap of his bounty he shall pay the owner of such trap five dollars for each coyote, or panther; four dollars for each black or brown bear; three dollars for each lynx or wild-cat – to be recovered, with costs, in an action on the case.
     Sec. 6.  If a person be found guilty of obtaining from a Justice of the Peace a certificate by false, fraudulent or deceitful practices, and in bad faith, he shall forfeit five times the amount of the bounty named on such certificate; such forfeiture to be recovered as is prescribed in the preceding section, and paid into the treasury of the proper county for the common use thereof.
     Sec. 8.  This Act shall take effect from and after its approval by the Governor.  +
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Np98 CCH February 3, 1885 
Bodies Found.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; wide margins.]
        ____
     On Saturday last, Nick Sap [sic] and Nelse [sic] Lewis found a body at Coffee Cove, near Rocky point [sic], which is supposed to be Rasmus Toft [sic], the fireman of the ill-fated Sol Thomas.  The body was brought to Empire on Sunday, and several parties viewed the remains.  The face and body were bloated beyond recognition, and not a vestige of the scalp remained, the skull being perfectly bare when found, but those acquainted with the deceased were satisfied as to his identity by the clothes.
     As most of the damage from the explosion was confined to the forward part of the vessel, and as the furnaces faced after, it is probable that Toft was not blown into the water by the explosion, but remained in the hold until the vessel rolled over, while attempts were being made to raise her.  His watch was found by Geo. Davis while raising the wreck last week, and a great many are under the impression that his body could have been recovered shortly after the explosion, if the vessel had remained afloat long enough to permit of a [sic] careful search.
     As we go to press intelligence is received of the finding of the body of Geo. Wadliegh [sic], engineer, opposite Empire.  The face is disfigured but otherwise the body is not mutilated.  – News.  +

Np98 CCH February 3, 1885 
     J. B. Hunt left on the 1st inst., with a span of horses, crossed the river at Morras’ place and took the trail by Fishtrap, Lampey, Bear, creeks [sic], making [sic] the trip to Bandon before night and beating the steamer.  He thinks very little work would make a good trail on that route, which is badly needed.  +

Np98 CCH February 3, 1885 
Fire.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; wide margins.]
____
     A fire occurred last Sunday night in the Robinson House, but fortunately, it was discovered in time and extinguished.  A severe gale was blowing, and if the fire had reached the exterior of the building, it would have swept the town.  Too much care cannot be given to the burning of naked lights; a spark will sometimes fly and ignite dry paper, cotton and other material that is highly inflammable.  While this occurrence was,no [sic] doubt, purely accidental, yet, [sic] there are many careless people, who having no responsibility resting on them, make light of those who do.
     In a former article we spoke of the necessity of having a supply of water on hand, and facilities for reaching the roofs of buildings; that was at the time of the Bennett fire; but, the danger once passed, and a little chin-music having been wasted on it, no further efforts were put forth.  A baptism of fire may prove an awakening from this state of torpidity and arouse our citizens to a keener sense of their responsibilities.  +
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Np99 CCH February 3, 1885 
The Debate.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; wide-ish margins.]
     The debate which, [sic] lasted one week, betwe4en W. H. Nosler, and J. P. Easter, on the question of the eternal punishment of the wicket, terminated on Saturday the 31st ult.  Easter assumed the affirmative, and Nosler the negative.  The school of debate is one well worthy of attention, as it affords opportunities for training the minds of the young – preparing them for that period when they may enter the arena of religious or political oratory.  But, we fail in seeing what has been settled by this debate.  What is the result?  The adherents of each have been entertained for a few evenings, but they have retired in the same spirit with which they approached the discussion.  “Convince a man against his will, he is of the same opinion still.”  We will offer an opinion next week; not for the purpose of eliciting controversy, but because we were requested to say a few words on the matter.  +

Np99 CCH February 3, 1885 
BORN.   Near Myrtle Point,
January. [sic] – to the wife of C. H. Bunch a son. [sic]  [+ text]

Np99 CCH February 3, 1885 
$10  $10  $10   WE WISH An Energetic Man or Woman in every neighborhood on the Pacific Coast.  For full particulars address,  A. L. Bancroft & Co., San Francisco.  [+ text.]
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Np100 CCH February 3, 1885 
Wit and Humor. 

     Gladstone prefers pantaloons that bag at the knees.  They give us that same mingled look of intellectuality and poverty which renders the average editor a man of influence in the community. 

     A common brick, if very dry, will absorb a quart of water.  The perfect brick of the human variety, however, although he is always very dry, wouldn’t absorb a quart of water in a year’s drinking.  Herein is seen the superiority of mind over matter. 
      The success of the two-cent postage stamp is so well established that a bill will be introduced to still further curtail postal expense.  It is contemplated by one of the house committee on postoffice [sic] affairs to introduce a bill allowing the 2-cent stamp to cover an ounce instead of a half ounce package, as of the present writing.  [all are +]
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[M. note, 2008.  This document contains most of the data from these issues except for some outside news and national-fillers (boilerplate).  Repeat-display-ads are generally not listed more than once in the year.]    =

     

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