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COQUILLE CITY HERALD   Coquille, OR.
[compiled and amended Nov. 2008; needs keywords]


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[Np107-201 open]

March 17, 1885  

Np202 CCH March 17, 1885 
THE CLERK’S COURTSHIP.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; narrow margins, abt same as paragraph indent.  Poem in smaller type than other text.]
                    ____
“Oh, Jean,” the dry goods clerk low sighed,
  “The calico to see.
Because I needle little bride
  Is – guess who it can be?
Jane’s plush brought forth thread cheeks
  Till they almost becambric red:
“Some prints ess all for lawn who may
    In pal-lace five, [sic, no quote] she said.
 She heard damask her yet to guess,
  “Hook ‘n eye want,” said he,
To furnish shawl my hair pin ess—
  Oh, who’ll make glove to me?”
The cherry satin near her drew,
  Sheeting-eld with delight.
For she was smitten with a new
  Found wrap sure naught could blight.
But when he cotton both his knees
  With, “Would jersey me tie?”
Chenille-y thought her blood would freeze
  And screamed, “Of corsets I.”
“Hose stocking nonsense to you, Jane?”
  Cried pa’ who entered quick;
“When I call linen bring this skein
   Some foulard mitts he’s sick.”
 Then kick gingham out in the hall,
  He sacque-ed the worsted bow,
And with a kersey cried, Come a’l [sic]
  And seersucker go.”
Poor Jean for cashmere had to wed,
  Which brocade a dear young heart.
Next summerino grave she laid
  At dress by her sweetheart.
                       --Detroit Free Press.  [+ text.]
=

Np203 CCH March 17, 1885 
THE INAUGUAL [sic; = inaugural] ADDRESS.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; margins abt the same as paragraph indent.]
                 _______
     In the presence of this vast assemblage of my countrymen I am about to supplement and send, by the oath which I shall take, the Federal manifestation of the will of a great and free people.  In the exercise of their power and right to self-government they have committed to one of their fellow-citizens a supreme and sacred trust, and he here consecrates himself to their service. This impressive ceremony adds little to the solemn sense of responsibility with which I contemplate the duty I owe to all the people of the land.  Nothing can relieve me from anxiety, lest by any act of mine their interests may suffer, and nothing is needed to strengthen my resolution to engage every faculty and effort in the promotion of their welfare. 
     1087 Amid the party strife, the people’s choice was made, but its attendant circumstances have demonstrated anew the strength and safety of a Government by the people.  In each succeeding year it more clearly appears that our Democratic principles need no apology and that, [sic] in its fearless and faithful application is to be the surest guarantee of good government.  But the best results to be found in the operation of a Government wherein every citizen has a share, largely depend on a proper limitation of purely party zeal and effort, and a correct appreciation of the time when the heat of partisanship should be merged into the patriotism of the citizen.  To-day the Executive branch of Government [sic] is transferred to a new keeping, but this is still a Government of all the people and it should be none the less an object of their affectionate solicitude.  At this hour the animosities of political strife, and the bitterness of partisan defeat and exultation of partisan triumph should be supplanted by ungrudging acquiescence in the popular will and sober, conscientious concern for the general weal.  Moreover, if from this hour we cheerfully and honestly abandon all sectional prejudice and distrust, and determine with confidence in one another to work out harmoniously the achievement of our national destiny, we shall deserve all the benefits which our happy form of Government can bestow.
     On this auspicious occasion we may well renew the pledge of our devotion to the constitution which, launched by the founders of the Republic and consecrated by their prayers and patriotic devotion, for a century borne the hopes and aspirations of a great people, through prosperity and peace, vast territory, through the shock of foreign conflicts, and through the perils of domestic strife.  By the father of his country our constitution was commended for adoption as the result of a spirit of amity and mutual conclusion.  In that same spirit is should be administered, in order to promote the lasting welfare of the country and to secure the full measure of its priceless benefits to us and to those who will succeed to the blessings of our national life. The large variety of diverse and competing interests subject to Federal control, persistently seeking recognition of their claims need give us no fear that “the greatest good to the greatest number” will fail to be accomplished, if in the halls of national legislation that spirit of amity and natural concession shall prevail in which the constitution  had its birth.  If this involves the surrender or postponement of private interests and abandonment of local advantages, compensation will be found in the assurance that thus the common interest is observed and the general welfare advanced.
     In the discharge of my official duty I shall endeavor to be guided by a just and unstrained construction of the constitution, a careful distinction between the powers guaranteed to the Federal Government and those reserved to the States or to the people, and by a cautious appreciation of those functions which by the constitution and laws have been assigned to the Executive branch [sic] of the Government.  But he who takes oath to-day to preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the United States only assumes that solemn obligation which every patriotic citizen on the farm, in the workshop, in the busy marts of trade, and everywhere, should share with him.  The constitution which prescribes his oath, my countrymen, is ours.  The Government which you have chosen him to administer for a time is yours, the laws and the entire scheme of our civil rule, from the town meeting to the State Capital, is yours.  Your every voter, as assuredly as your Chief Magistrate, under the same high sanction, although in a different sphere, exercises a public trust.  Nor is this all; every citizen owes to the country a vigilant watch on close scrutiny of its public servants, and a fair and reasonable estimate of their fidelity and usefulness.  Thus is the people’s will impressed upon the whole framework of our civil policy, municipal, States and [sic] Federal.  And this is the price of our liberty and the inspiration of your faith in the Republic.
     It is the duty of those serving the people in a public place closely to limit the public expenditures to the actual needs of a government economically administered, because this bounds the right of a government to exact tribute from the earnings of labor or the property of citizens, and because of public extravagance among the people.  We should never be ashamed of the simplicity and prudential economies which are best suited to the operation of a Republican form of government, and most compatible with the mission of the American people.  Those who are selected for a limited time to manage public affairs are still of the people and may do much by their example to encourage, consistently with the dignity of their official functions, that plain way of life which, amid their fellow citizens, aids integrity and promotes thrift and prosperity.
     The genius of our institutions, the needs of our people in their home life, and the attention which is demanded for settlement or development of the resources of our vast territory, dictate the scrupulous avoidance of any departure from foreign policy commended by history, tradition and the prosperity of our Republic.  It is a policy of independence, favored by our position and defined by our known love of justice, and by power; it is a policy of peace, suitable to our interests; it is a policy of peace, suitable to our interests; it is a policy full of neutrality, rejecting all share in foreign broils and ambitions upon other continents and repelling their intrusion here; it is the policy of Monroe and Washington and Jefferson, of peace, commerce and honest friendship with all nations; entangling relations with none.
     A due regard for the interests and prosperity of all the people demands that our finances shall be established upon such a sound and sensible basis as shall serve the safety and confidence of business interests, and make the wage of labor sure and steady; and that our system of revenue be so adjusted as to relieve the people from unnecessary taxation, having due regard to the interests of capital invested and workingmen employed in American industries; and preventing the accumulation of a surplus in the Treasury to an extend that induces extravagance and waste.
     Care for the prosperity of the nation and for the needs of future settlers require that the public domain should be protected from purloining schemes and unlawful occupation.
     The conscience of the people demands that the Indians within our boundaries shall be fairly and honestly treated as wards of the Government, and their education and civilization promoted with a view to their ultimate citizenship.
     Polygamy in the Territories is destructive of the family and of religion, and offensive to the moral sense of the civilized world, and shall be repressed.
     The laws should be rigidly enforced which prohibit immigration of a servile-class [sic] to compete with American labor, with no intention of requiring citizenship, and bringing with them and retaining habits and customs repugnant to our civilization.
     The people demand reform in the administration of government and application of business principles to public affairs, and as a means to this end, civil service reform should be in good faith enforced. Our citizens have a right to protection from the incompetency [sic] of public employes [sic], and those who hold their places only as a reward of partisan service, and from the corruptive influence of those who promise, and the vicious methods of those who expect such rewards.  Those who worthily seek public employment have the right to insist that merit and competency shall be recognized instead of party subserviency [sic] or surrender of honest political belief.
     In the administration of a government pledged to do equal and exact justice to all men, there should be no pretext for anxiety touching the protection of freedmen in their rights, or their security in the enjoyment of their privileges under the constitution and its amendments.  All discussion to their fitness for the place accorded to them as American citizens is idle and unprofitable, except as it suggests the necessity for their improvement.  The fact that they are citizens entitles them to all the rights due to this relation, and charges them with all its duties and obligations and responsibilities
     These topics and the constant and evervarying [sic] wants of an active and enterprising population may well receive the attention and patriotic endeavor of all who make and execute the Federal law.  Our duties are practical and call for an industrious application, an intelligent preception [sic] of the claims of public office, and above all a firm determination of united action to secure to all the people of the land the full benefits of the best form of government ever vouchsafed to man.  And let us not trust to human effort alone, but humbly acknowledge the power and the goodness of Almighty God, who presides over the destiny of Nations [sic], and who has at all times been revealed in our country’s history.  Let us invoke His aid and His blessing upon our labors.  +
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Np204 CCH March 17, 1885  (1146)
Bandon. [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; wide margins.]
    ___
     We are glad to be able to announce that a steamer will run in here before long, and trade between the Coquille river and San Francisco.  We need scarcely say that designs with this object in view have been previously entertained, but in considering the matter cooly [sic], they are reluctantly abandoned.  The fact is, and it has been demonstrated in England over and over again, that a shoal water vessel [sic] cannot be a deep water vessel at the same time.  But the world is advancing and we are advancing with it.  A gentleman who was born an engineer and has lived all his life a practical one, has after many years of anxious thought, and much experimenting, satisfied himself and other earnest engineers, that a vessel drawing only six and a half feet of water can go into deep water with impunity.  He advocates a strong stern wheel [sic], going deep into deep water and thereby when in motion throwing forward great motive force.  As this deep wheel could not work in shoal water [sic], he has invented machinery for lifting it up sufficiently and thereby grading its power so as to suit its capacity in the waters it works in, and then when out in the ocean letting it down to its full depth and let it run [sic] full blast.
     The Parkersburg arrived here Thursday March 5th. She sailed in and up to the wharf at Port Of Bandon [sic] without any assistance.  She had a varied assortment of freight for our long and extensive river.  Amongst the rest was a little steam engine occupying a floor size of 18 by 24 inches.  When we first saw this presumptuous little locomotive we thought it was a flower pot.  This cheeky audacious little pigmy [sic] possesses a five horse power, [sic] and makes 400 revolutions as its ordinary work, but when tested at its full power, at the works where it was made, it made no less than 1500 revolutions during the same time.  It also effects [sic] a very considerable saving not only in cost pro rata [sic] when compared with the cost of other engines, but also in fuel.  Amongst the other curiosities turned up from the inexhaustible and mysterious depths of the hold was a patent churn.  This professes to separate the cream from the milk, turn the former into butter, some of the latter into hog feed, and the balance into other productive items of various sorts.  As we did’nt [sic] read the advertisement through we cannot say whether it undertook to sell the butter.  It may however, and we would not be surprised if amongst other articles s old was the buyer.  There were various consignments on board of groceries and store goods for people on the river and coast.  This is a trade that is greatly on the increase, and we regret it.  Whatever profit is to be made by the sale of these articles ought to go into the pockets of our own storekeepers, provided they gave us these articles for what we can get them elsewhere, and they can do so if they wish.  They can get their goods at wholesale in the city just as well as the city man and for the same price.  Or course there is the freight up here, but let that go against the clerkage and heavy taxes and rents paid below, and our local man will still have big odds on his side.  Let them come down by Smiths [sic] prices [sic] and give us good value for the same money as he does and they will hear no more of Smiths cash grocery store.  [sic]
     According to the “monthly weather review” for December published by the “Signal Service” at Washington the difference between the extreme maximum and minimum temperatures at the twelve government stations of California, average was 40 degrees.  In Florida at the seven stations there the average was 46 degrees.  Here in Bandon the difference between our extremes for the same month was only 27 deg. [sic]
     Mr. Tomlinson [sic, no comma] who arrived here a few days ago from York Co., Ontario Canada, [sic] says that the day he left, the temperature was 20 degrees below zero.  He wasn’t here one week when the thermometer scored 66 above zero.
     M. E. Anderson has removed from the hotel at Port Bandon to his former residence at Maryville near the rock of Gibralter.  [M. 2008;  a rock formation near Bandon, or the real Gibralter?]
                                         Legem.  +
=

Np205 CCH March 17, 1885 
     During the two sessions of the Forty-eighth Congress there have been introduced in the House 8286 bills and 340 joint resolutions.  The following measures of general importance have been enacted into laws:  Bills to establish a bureau of labor [sic]; to establish a bureau of animal industry; to prevent the spread of pleuropneumonia [sic] and other contagious diseases among domestic animals; to repeal the test oath act of 1862; to limit to three years the time in which prosecutions may begin against persons for violation of internal revenue laws; to establish a bureau of navigation in the treasury department; to grant letter carriers at delivery offices fifteen days leave of absence, with pay, in a year; to provide a retired list for soldiers and marines who have served continuously for thirty years or upwards; to reduce the rate of postage on newspapers and other periodicals of the second class, when not sent by others than the publisher or news agent, to one cent for each four ounces; to remove certain burdens from the American merchant marine [sic] (the Dingley shipping bill) [sic; parens] to provide civil government for Alaska; to prevent and punish counterfeiting in the United States of bonds or other securities of foreign Governments; to extend the duration of the Court of Commissioners of Alabama Claims; to make all public roads and highways post roads; to make it felony [sic] for any person to falsely personate [sic; -impersonate] an officer or employe [sic] of the United States acting under authority of the United States; to remove the charge of desertion from soldiers of the late war, who after having served faithfully until the close of the war, left their commands without leave; to provide for the location of a branch home for disabled volunteer soldiers of the Mexican war and the war of 1812, whose disabilities were not incurred in service against the United States; to reorganize the corps [sic] of Judge Advocate of the Army; to declare forfeited certain lands granted to aid in the construction of a railroad from Portland to Astoria, Oregon; reorganize the Inspector General Department of the Army; to provide for ascertainment of claims of American citizens for spoiliations [sic] committed by the French prior to July 31, 1801, by referring them to a Court of Claims.  +

Np205 CCH March 17, 1885  [1189] 
     A string of music – tightening the strings on a violin. +
    
Np205 CCH March 17, 1885 
     What is the best covering for hair? Demands a Western journal.  Hair isn’t bad. +

Np205 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Tin and brass do not go well together, says a scientific paper.  Mr. Science, you,re [sic] away off.  It’s always the fellow with brass that gets the girl with tin.  +
=

Np206 CCH March 17, 1885 
[editorial location]
WOOLEN MILL.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium margins.]
          ___
     As will be seen by a communication in this paper there is a desire among some that the poople [sic] of this county, and particularly of this river, realize the importance of establishing a woolen mill here.  No one can doubt that such an enterprise would be profitable in many ways.  The objection that is being urged is that the people are not full-handed enough, which is a very serious objection if well founded, but we are inclined to the belief that the objection is not well taken, since an enterprize [sic] of this kind is usually divided up into shares, allowing a person to take just whatever amount he sees fit.  They find means to prosecute their present business, and getting more capital invested each succeeding year, [sic] we fail to see why they could not just as well invest a small amount ina [sic] good,profitable [sic] business that would be the life of other business that they had property in. [sic]  Unless we manufacture we may as well at once settle down to raising produce at San Francisco prices, freight added.  This valley is rich in natural wealth, but at present low prices and high freights we have nothing except gold dust that is susceptible of good profits after shipping in its raw state.  Then it behooves us to manufacture all we can, and to this end every company should engage all its spare capital – and by this we do not mean just what you have to throw away, but every cent you can rake and scrape –in [sic] some profitable manufactory at or close to home.  Choose your enterprise; there is no opposition.  There are splendid openings in anything to be made of wood.  A starch factory would be highly profitable since it is known that potatoes are rich in starch here.  Cheese should be manufactured here instead of being shipped from other places. It is among the possibilities that beet-root sugar can be made here as well as in other parts.  We might go on to enumerate a score of other necessary articles that might be manufactured here profitably, but leave them to suggest themselves to you.  But by all means give the matter some thought.  Let us hear from others.  +

Np206 CCH March 17, 1885 
Communicated.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text, medium-wide margins.]
       ____
     ED. HERALD: -- I see by your paper that you are doing what you can to induce your people to start a woolen mill.  This is a thing devoutly to be wished, and I hope the people will give heed and assist you in getting this enterprise duly inaugurated.  Tour Bandon correspondent has well considered this matter, and it is to be hoped that the people, generally, will take an interest in the matter.  As you say, there is little or nothing to be made at farming, for the reason that we are all trying to do the same thing.  If there is anything for which this part is specially adapted it is that of raising sheep, and once a good woolen mill in the county, [sic] the woods will be litterally [sic] alive with sheep.  One business will promote the interests of another; a woolen mill incline to make goods cheaper [sic], the benefits [sic] of which will affect everybody; it will make sheep raising profitable, and bring money into the country.  I firmly believe that money invested in a woolen mill in this county would pay interest direct, which is very encouraging when we come to consider the indirect benefits it would insure to every person around.  By all means keep the project on foot, [sic]  The people are bound to see it in its true light, and stock in the enterprise will be taken in every community in the county.
                                             A Farmer.
     Myrtle Point,  Mar. 12.  +

Np206 CCH March 17, 1885
     From a note from Hon. B. Herman [sic] we learn that his mill at this place will be started up as soon as it can be put in running order after his return from Washington.  +
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Np207 CCH March 17, 1885 
     The saloon of G. A. Brown, of this place, was burglarized on Monday night, the 2nd inst., and a revolver, a 5-gallon demijohn of whisky [sic] and some 8 or 9 boxes of cigars stolen.  Since [sic], the demijohn and one box of cigars have been recovered.  They were found in Herman’s [sic] saw mill [sic] cashed [sic] away in the sawdust, being traced thither by visits of certain parties who were imbibing from the whisky-jug [sic].  Up to this time no arrests have been made, but a warrant is out, and it is only a question of time until the guilty will have to suffer.  Two weeks ago we knew nothing of the affair, and could not consequently, say anything about it; and last week at the request of several prominent citizens we kept mum, at which some kick.  It has been the expressed sentiment of all that we should not give names and try the case through our columns, “as a certain paper is in the habit of doing.”  Before impugning [sic] the motive for which the item was omitted these kickers should have informed themselves as to whose suggestion it was at, [sic] that it was omitted.  If they were anxious for the item to appear, as one of them expressed himself, “so that the burglar would know what was what and get up and leave the country thereby saving the county a great deal of cost,” they would find few sympathizers.  As an item in which no names were used could not be of any information which could lead to an arrest, and would only be understood by the burglar and those who were already cognizant of the facts, we can put no other construction on their motive for wanting the item, than that given above.  +

Np207 CCH March 17, 1885 
      A note from Uncle Chris Lehnherr, from Holbrook, Arizona, give [sic] us to understand that he was then on his way to friends in Illinois.  He said he would on arriving at St. Louis take steamer passage, as he was tired of the railroad.  His letter had been wet and the items had all run together or we could doubtless give our readers an interesting letter. At any rate we made out that he was at an elevation of 5110 miles [sic] above a sea level, and that had we, of this part, been in any way astronomically inclined we might, at about 10:30 o’clock A. M. on the 1st inst., have seen his form pass rapidly over the sun’s disc.  May his shadow never grow less.  +

Np207 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Our attention has been called to the fact that people along the river, and particularly at the mouth of Beaver slough, are throwing large amounts of brush and timber into the river.   This is wrong and ought to be stopped at once.  As a matter of course we do not expect any person to make complaint, but every person should have enough interest in the welfare of the river to see that its navigation is not spoiled.  A scow load of tangled brush which sinks readily, is liable to build the foundation of an island, which would have the effect to cause the river to encroach on its present banks.  +
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Np208 CCH March 17, 1885  
    On Friday last W. Sinclair, Esq., paid Mrs. Robinson, of the Robinson house, $19 for damages by a small fire reported some time ago.  This is the first ever paid on a policy in this town.  Although the damage was light, it speaks volumes to our people.  It was by the merest chance that the house did not burn, and had it done so, the whole town would have been in ashes in three hours, for the wind was blowing a fearful gale at the time.  We must have water or insure our property.  +

Np208 CCH March 17, 1885 
     In justice to Representative Roberts we will say that the omission of “panther” in the bill he introduced for the destruction of noxious animals, and which was published in this paper some time ago, was simply an omission of the state printer.  +

Np208 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Yesterday morning it turned quite dusk, and overcoats were brought into requisition.  The expression, “it is going to snow,” was heard from more than one person, seemingly forgetful that it was the result of an eclipse of the sun.  +

Np208 CCH March 17, 1885 
Heavy Seas.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; wide margins.]
     ___
     Occasionally we observe an item going the rounds of the press, on the hight [sic] of the waves, their length and force, etc.  Picking up a paper the other day, the following bit of information – which is news to us – caught our eye:  “The waves to the southward of Cape Horn are longer, higher and more dangerous than in any other locality.  This is owing to the fact that there is a belt around the globe, in the southern seas, unobstructed by any land; consequently, the waves have free play and greater force.”
     A fertile pen and a vivid imagination can produce wonders.  Our experience has taught us that the heaviest seas are caused by obstruction, shoal bottom and cross currents.  Having some knowledge regarding three places, where the sea is rough, [sic] without mentioning many others that we have seen, we will give our opinion in reference to their particular qualities.  We refer to Cape Horn, the Cape of good Hope [sic] and the passage between Cape Hatteras and Bermuda.  To the southward of the Cape of Good Hope, the most exposed of any, there is a shoal bank extending for some distance.  In heavy gales of wind, this bank is the cause of a tremendous sea which topples over and breaks.  Now, the great danger lies in the breaking of the sea, many vessels having been lost, and all hands by pooping [sic] – a nautical term for taking the sea over the stern.  This is supposed – from experience – to have occurred by reason of the gale abating, and the vessel being unable, in consequence, to sail ahead fast enough to keep out of the way of seas that were high, breaking and running with greater speed than the vessel.  We have scudded under bare poles in a full rigged ship cotton loaded [sic], in the dead of winter, for three days and nights, off in the direction between Hatteras and Bermuda, when the sea would make veterans look astern to see it coming – thinking it would be sure to overwhelm the vessel.  We have been off Cape Horn in the winter of ’48, and had a hard time getting to the southward to pass it; but, while the sea is long and heavy, it does not, in our opinion equal the other two in point of danger.
     We must credit those portions of the “multitudinous seas” where there is great obstruction, with the most dangerous waves.  Theories will not do in this instance; romancing is but the sheerest folly; it is the practical experience that gives us a picture drawn without the aid or color of fiction.
                                                          Le Garcon.  +
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Np209 CCH March 17, 1885 
Silver Ore Discovered.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium-narrow margins?]
          _______
     VINCENNES, Ind.,  March 9. – Considerable excitement prevails among the residents in the vicinity of Augusta, Pike county, south of this city, over the discovery of large quantities of silver ore, which has been found in the hills near that place.  Capitalists from St. Louis, New York and Indianapolis have been there making an examination.  +

Np209 CCH March 17, 1885 
The Boomers.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium margins.]
         ___
     Wichita, Kansas, March 9. – Warrants were issued for fifteen other boomers Saturday, and twenty-five yesterday.  The authorities will continue to issue warrants as they get names.  Captain Couch informed a reporter that he would start for Arkansas [sic] City in the morning, and the colony would move in a day or two.  General Hatch will leave here on the same train with Couch, and will join the troops there.  +

Np209 CCH March 17, 1885  
The Russo-Afghan Question.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; margins slightly wider than paragraph indent.]
               _______
     LONDON, March 10. – The Pall Mall Gazette says it is believed the news received last evening to the effect that Russians had advanced their outposts in Zulpkar [sic] pass further south instead of withdrawing north, as requested by England, is correct.  The Gazette says there can be no doubt great fears are entertained of a collision between Russian and Afghan troops, as this last advance has placed the opposing outposts face to face, and taken the Russians much nearer Afghan territory.  There is no indication, says the Gazette, that the Russians have gone beyond what they consider the Afghan boundary line.  +

Np209 CCH March 17, 1885 
War Imminent.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium? Margins]
        ___
     London, March 11.  – Financial circles are excited over official reports received this afternoon confirming the report published in the Times this morning to the effect that Russian troops have advanced still further into Afghan territory.  The Russian Government admits such movement has taken place, but asserts it was only intended for the purpose of seeking a more suitable position in case of war with Afghanistan.  It is generally believed that both Afghans and Russians are hurrying forward and a collision is imminent.  British consols [sic] have fallen eleven-sixteenth of 1 percent, in consequence of the above news.  +
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Np210 CCH March 17, 1885 
Meeting of the Cabinet.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium-narrow margins, indented slightly more than paragraph indent.]
            ___
     Washington, March 10;  -- The Cabinet met promptly at noon, all the members being present.  It is understood the session was devoted almost entirely to consideration of Federal appointments.  It is asserted on good authority that each member of the Cabinet submitted a list of appointments in his department held to be essential to the administration of public business under the present regime.  The lists, it is understood, included only such offices in which a change is desirable at once, in order that the new secretaries might discharge the duties of their office without the least friction of embarrassment.  The deliberations of the Cabinet will probably result in a long list of nominations being sent to the Senate by the President to-day or to-morrow [sic].  +

Np210 CCH March 17, 1885 
The Railroad Strike [sic, no period]  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium? Margins.]
           ___
     St. Louis, March 11. – R. S. Hayes, Senior Vice President of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, in an interview on the strike, said:  “The main question in this strike is one of personal liberty or whether a handful of men who are not satisfied with their position as employes [sic] shall be allowed to prevent other men who have no expressed cause of dissatisfaction from continuing at work.  Out of 25,000 employs [sic] of the Southwestern, Wabash systems, not 1000 are directly affected by the reduction of wages, and I am certain that of this 1000 at least 500 would go to work to-morrow [sic] if they were not restrained by these bulldozing co-employes.  The reduction made is in regard to men employed in machine shops and round houses [sic].  Train service hands have not been reduced.  Reductions have been principally in Texas.”
     St. Louis, March 11.  – Nothing new in the railroad strike here this morning.  A committee from Sedalia [sic] has called on the men in the Missouri and Pacific shops, but it is understood got little, if any, satisfaction.  It is stated that the men in the Missouri and Pacific shops here have decided not to go out.  Militia companies which left here yesterday are still resting between Jefferson City and Sedaila [sic].  Negotiations for a compromise between the road men are now going on.  +

Np210 CCH March 17, 1885 
    San Francisco sailors are on a strike.  They want $35 and $30 is the price being paid.  +
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Np211 CCH March 17, 1885 
NOTICE BY ADMINISTRATRIX.  [head, centered, bold, same size as text; medium-narrow margins.]
     Notice is hereby given, that by virtue of an order of the county court of the state of Oregon for the county of Coos made on this the 8th day of January, 1885, in the matter of the estate of Jesse Fouts, deceased, commanding me, the administratrix of said estate, to sell the real property of said deceased hereinafter described, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to pay the claims against said estate and the expenses of administration, amounting to about the sum of eight hundred and thirty dollars, in the manner provided by law for the sale of real property on execution.
     Now, therefore I will on Saturday the 18th of April, 1885, at the hour of one o’clock in the afternoon of that day, at the court house door, [sic] in Empire City, in said Coos county, offer for sale and sell for cash do [sic] or public auction, to the highest bidds-therefor,t he [sic] following described real estate, to wit: the S. E. ¼ of Sec. 35, and the West ½ of the South West ¼ of Sec. 36, less  25 acres heretofore sold to Amanda Snyder by deed dated November 24th 1875 and recorded on page 608 of Book six of deeds of the records of Coos County, Oregon all in township 27 South of Range 13 West of the Willamette [sic] Meridian and in the said County of Coos, or so much thereof as may be necessary to satisfy the said claims and expenses.
                                                          Elizabeth Fouts,
                                                                   Administratrix [sic, no period]  [+ text.]
Local Items.

Np211 CCH March 17, 1885 
     J. A. Lehnherr was in town Saturday.  +

Np211 CCH March 17, 1885 
     C. W. Getty is foreman of the mill at Empire.  +

Np211 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Assessor Harlocker was assessing this place Friday and Saturday.  +

Np211 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Parker’s mill will not run again for some time, and Capt. Parker will soon go to San Francisco.  +

Np211 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Mrs.-------- [sic] wife of the head sawyer at Parker’s mill was very sick and called Dr. Angell on Friday.  + [M 2008. Line is solid, not dotted, but is not in underline-position.]

Np211 CCH March 17, 1885 
     We notice beef cattle passing through the bay markets that are rolling fat, that have wintered entirely on out range [sic].  +

Np211 CCH March 17, 1885 
     The Katie Cook broke off one flange of her propeller on returning to Parkersburg after towing the Parkersburg to sea.  +

Np211 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Edwin E. Stillwell returned from Empire Friday, suffering from a fall which he received while at work on the new mill.  +

Np211 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Our esteemed friend Fred. [sic] Kronenberg has returned from a visit to friends and relatives at Port Orford where he has been for two weeks.  +

Np211 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Manly Roberts and lady passed down on their way to Bandon.  Mrs. R. will visit friends at Port Orford, and Manly will go back to the bay.  +
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Np212 CCH March 17, 1885 
     The schooner Coquille is preparing to sail.  She has been taking on match-wood [sic] at Randolph, and will also take salmon at Machado’s.  +

Np212 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Messrs. Kerriger [sic] and Flanagan, assisted by Billy Neal, drove a splendid band of fat cattle through town Friday.  The cattle were from John Mast’s, at Rowland Prairie.  +

Np212 CCH March 17, 1885  [1300]
    We notice by Superintendent McCormac’s report that there are 43 school districts represented, in this county, and that we employ 48 teachers in the public schools – males 25 and females 23.  +

Np212 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Capt. Littlefield has received instructions to expend the balance of the last appropriation on the breakwater, by filling in between the piles with rock.  Owen Short is to have charge so we hear.  [sic]  +

Np212 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Please settle subscription arrearages and don’t forget to send the cash when ordering one of the papers we club with.  We have to pay cash, which we would be unable to do if we did not receive it.  +

Np212 CCH March 17, 1885 
     The tug Katie Cook was launched Tuesday, and started for Bandon with the Parkersburg in tow, but stuck on the mudflat opposite McCue’s where she remained over night.  Next morning she proceeded on her way.  The Parkersburg sailed on Friday.  +

Np212 CCH March 17, 1885 
    Capt. C. F. W, [sic] Von Pegert will commence driving piles for Capt. Parker on Monday next.  He is now engaged in making garden.  The way he makes sticks and roots fly is a caution, and one would suppose he was born with a spade in his hand.  +

Np212 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Good vegetables and beautiful flowers cannot be grown from inferior Seeds [sic].  If our readers would procure the best, they should purchase only those grown and put up by the old established and reliable parties [sic].   D. M. FERRY & Co., of Detroit, Mich., whose advertisement appears in our columns, have been [sic] in the Seed business for 29 years, and we believe are as well and as favorably known as any house in their business in the United States.   Their trade extends to every hamlet in the country, and they pride themselves in sending out only the very best of all varieties of Seeds.  We would invite all purchasers to procure their catalogue before buying.  +

Np212 CCH March 17, 1885  
     Chas. Metlan [sic] and George Martin were in town Saturday.  +

Np212 CCH March 17, 1885 
     L. L. Harmon, of Gravel Ford, called on us Wednesday.  +
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Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Mrs. J. A. Garfield, of Marshfield, arrived in town Saturday.  +

Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
      Mr. W. H. Carothers is moving into his new residence this week.  +

Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Our neighbor, D. P. Strang moved from this place yesterday to his farm.  [sic]  +

Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Joe C Dean [sic, no period] is fencing and otherwise improving his property in town.  +

Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
     The balance of the last appropriation is being expended on the Coquille bar.  +

Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
     J. Oman [sic], ship carpenter of Parkersburg, has been visiting his family in this place.  +

Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Hon. G. M. Dyer left for the bay yesterday morning, having been in town since Saturday.  +

Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Ed. [sic] Sherwood, of Catching creek, was in town Sunday to get medicine for his wife who is sick.  +

Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
     J. A. Tobin [sic, no comma] formerly of this place, but lately of Los Angeles, is in town under Dr. Angell’s care.  +

Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Eld. [sic] Canterbury has purchased land of E. B. Miller out north of town, and will hereafter be a citizen of this place.  +

Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
     M. E. Anderson and lady were in town Friday en route to their farm on Middle fork, where they go for a few days to look after their interests there.  +

Np213 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Elder Canterbury held divine service here Sunday.  He told us that his church will commence a series of meetings here on the [  ] Sunday in next month.  +
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Np214 CCH March 17, 1885  
     Hon. B. Herman [sic] writes that Coquille City will, for a certainty, become a money order office on July 1st next.  He made application personally, for us, and in a letter from the superintendent of the money-order system, which letter we hold, we see that our office has been placed on the money-order list.  +

Np214 CCH March 17, 1885 
     A certain young man of this place who is known for his gallantry, is cautioned against holding to the rim of his hat with one hand while the other is placed over the pit of his stomach, during street prominades with the girls.  It doesn’t look elegant, and suggests to some that he is afflicted with neuralgia and choelra-morbus.  +  [sic; =cholera]

Np214 CCH March 17, 1885 
     Anton Wirth returned Thursday from the vicinity of Denmark where he has sold and delivered about 2600 of his best varieties of fruit trees – apples, peaches, pears, plums, prunes, cherries, apricots, etc.  The people there are waking up to the fact that fruit is necessary on the farm.  Another lot of trees will go down again this week.  +

Np214 CCH March 17, 1885 
     A gentleman wants to know who has buckwheat for sale.  It grows well here and we wonder why it is not more extensively raised.  In parts of California it is a sure and paying crop, and since it grows well here we fail to see why its production should not be profitable.  Anyone having buckwheat for sale will confer with J. K. P. Elliott, Elliott, [sic] Coos county.  +

Np214 CCH March 17, 1885  
Teacher’s Examination.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium margins.] 
             ____
     There will be a public examination of those desiring teachers’ certificates, at Coquille City on Friday, March 27, and at Marshfield on Saturday, March 28, 1885.  While the law requires but one examination to be held during each quarter, it has been decided, on account of the great expense to which teachers are necessarily subjected making the trip from Coquille to Coos bay and vice versa, to hold one at each of the above places.
                                    J. T. McCormac,
County School Superintendent.
                               Marshfield, Mar. 7, 1885.  +

Np214 CCH March 17, 1885     1336
THE ENTERTAINMENT.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; margins slightly more than paragraph indent.]
           _______
      The dramatic performance on Saturday evening, the 14th, was a great surprise to many in this section, who have been accustomed to theatricals of yore.  The performers were of the amateur class and had undertaken a creation that required considerable versatility as well as experience.  When an amateur assumes a double role, he or she must, of necessity, be aware of the difficulties encountered; and, the strain on the mind, coupled with the desire for success in addition with that to please the audience are of themselves no light task.  We were prepared and expected some failures, but, we were agreeably disappointed.  Mrs. Ellen Sinclair in the two characters of Mehitable Cartwright and that of Mrs. Morgan evinced [sic] decided talent.  Mr. Geo. McEwan, as “Sample Switchel,” took all his acquaintances by storm – they had no idea of his being able to render the old Yankee so remarkably well.  Mr. W. Angell deserves special mention for his coolness and sedate carriage, attributes essential to the success of those who essay to reap the laurel in the histrionic arena.  Our old friend, H. S. Kribs, as the heavy villain, displayed a klowledge [sic] of the stage, and a coolness that warrants us in saying that, were it necessity, he would soon overcome that sameness which is peculiarly the style of the low comedian.  The celebrated low comedian, John Wood – and there were few better than he – was addicted to that sameness of style.  Mr. M. C. Miller, as Joe Morgan [sic, no comma] displayed talent of a high order, the scene where his child is dying, and the actions depicting the evil effect of liquor, were truly pathetic.  Mrs. McEwan and Mrs. Aiken, rendered valuable assistance towards making the play a grand success, and any further demonstration will hardly be complete without their assistance.  In a concise criticism of a performance, local in its character, and where all strove to do their best, it would be wrong to carry the individuality of the performance to any extreme; but, this article would not be complete if no mention were made of the youthful effort of Miss Annie Leneve; her memory, coolness, and consistent realization of the weight of the character in the death-bed scene, deserves great praise.  It is seldom that we find a child coming up to an estimate of what is needed as the climax to a tragedy.  Take this performance on its merits, the citizens of the Coquille, or at least a portion of them, have missed a treat, and from our old experience of such matters, we venture this prediction, that, with a little more care towards scenic effect, Coquille City will yet turn out a first-class dramatic association.
     Chas [sic, no period] Zumwalt, W. Sinclair, S. Gallier and Johnny Leneve who also carried their parts with much credit, are specially deserving.  Mr. Sinclair, as Bonnycastle, in the after piece, was simply immense.  +
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Np215-6 CCH March 17, 1885  
OUR NEIGHBORS.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium-wide? Margins]
         _______
     [Coast Mail.] [M. first brackets sic; centered; very small type.]
     A gentleman from Bandon says Fraser Tupper had the misfortune to cut off one of his big toes a short time ago while chopping wood.
     A. Nasburg has moved into his new residence and has rented his old residence to Ole Evansn [sic], who will use it as a workshop for his cabinet business. 
    Notices of intention to take out liquor licenses are becoming numerous and it is probable that the applicants will go to the extent of the law in force at present, that they may get the further away from the new law to go into effect about the middle of May.
             ____ [M 2008. centered]
        [Coos Bay News.]  [first brackets, sic.  centered, not bold, very small type.]
     Empire has spelling school, choir meeting and skating every Thursday evening. 
    W. H. Noble has got 320 logs in the water, at his camp hear Eastport, which it is estimated will scale over 400,000 feet.
     The weather was unusually warm at this place during the latter part of the past week.  The thermometer at Golden’s drug store stood at 85 in the shade on Friday last, and on the sawdust 107 in the sun was reached.
      Albert Allen, infant son of Mr [sic, no period] and Mrs. Allen Arrington, died on Friday last, at Centerville, aged four months and five days.  The child had been suffering for several days with a severe attack of whooping cough, to which it finally succumbed.  The funeral took place on Sunday last, from the Church at this place, where services were held, Rev. W. Lund, officiating, and the large attendance was the best evidence of the heartfelt sympathy which is extended to the bereaved parents.
     A man named John Fisher killed a panther near the forks of the north fork of Coos river, last week.  It seems that Fisher, in company with two or three others, who were employed in a logging camp, had started out to work.  After proceeding a short distance they spied a panther, asleep, close to the road and within a few feet of them.  Fisher was carrying a hatchet in his hand at the time which he threw at the “varmint.” hitting it in the head and partially stunning it.  He then placed a limb of a tree, which happened to be close at hand, across the panther’s body, and jumping on the limb held the animal down while the other boys dispatched it with a club.  Another panther, supposed to be the mate of the one above mentioned, was killed in the same neighborhood a few days previously by a countryman of Fisher’s, who went close up to the animal and shot it with bird shot.  When it comes to killing panthers the Russian Fin [sic] boys take the cake.  +
     On Monday of last week, Edward Haywood and Lyman Noble, while walking on the beach near Charles Eckhoff’s upper landing, below Centerville, noticed something in the sand, which, on investigation, proved to be the remains of a human being.  The box which enclosed the remains was in a fair state of preservation, as were also the boots and clothes in which the deceased were buried.  Noble and Haywood dug a grave on the hill, opposite where the remains were discovered, and buried them. On investigation it was ascertained that the remains were those of Ben Besse, who was drowned on April 25th, 1867.  It seems he, in company with Wm. Palmer, Nelse [sic] Lewis and a man named White, were coming to Marshfield from Empire, on that date, in a sail boat, and when nearly opposite the Lone [  ] Tree between Empire and North Bend, the boat capsized.  All parties swam ashore except Besse, who was drowned.  The body was found six weeks after the accident by Tim Ricker, opposite where E. B. Dean & Co’s. store now stands.  Ricker was coroner at that time, and took charge of the body.  He procured an assistant; made a box for the remains, and started for the grave yard at Empire.  When the arrived opposite Echoff’s, the stench from the body became unbearable, and they ran the boat ashore and buried it [sic] in the sand.  Besse was about 38 years old at the time of his death.  He had served in the civil war, and the soldiers [sic] belt which he wore was wrapped around the remains when discovered.
       ____ [centered]
[Roseburg Review.] [centered, not bold; medium-wide margins; very small type.]
         The outlook for better prices for wheat is improving.
     Hen fruit [sic] is below par – 12 ½ cents per doz.  Cheaper than meat.
     Roseburg is getting more public spirited.  Just think of a four mill school tax!
     1885 will be a prosperous year for Roseburg.  Our people are working together.
     J. B. Nesmith, son of Col, [sic] J. W. Nesmith informs the West Side that the mental condition of his father is improving and that he may return home in a short time.
     It has been freely talked that St. John had killed the temperance cause, but from the amount of legislation enacted by the Oregon legislature, the point does not seem to have been well taken.
        ____ [centered]
[Southwest Oregon Recorder.] [centered, not bold; medium-narrow margins; very small type.]
     R. Pomroy &son [sic] of Crescent City will run White’s dairy this year.
     Mr. Nygren went down to the docks opposite Rocky Point and caught a fine lot of rock cod last week.  They are a fine, juicy fish.
     The Directors for the school district across the river have engaged D. E. Stitt to teach their school year.  We did not learn when it was expected that the term would begin.
        ____\ [centered]
[Gold Beach Gazette.]  [centered, not bold; medium? Margins; very small type.]
     Bad colds prevail throughout the county.
     The steamer Hume is due at this place.
     F. W. Colebrook is suffering with a severe attack of paralysis.
     Rev. C. B. Masters and family will remove to Coos county next week.
     Mr. Divilbiss and sons are busy at work developing their silver mines.
[space]
      ____  [centered]
[Plaindealer.]  [centered, not bold, wide margins; very small type.]
     Whoopingcough [sic] is prevalent
     Aaron Rose is opening up his new addition to the town of Roseburg.
      Stock in Douglas county is in excellent condition for this time of year.
     Several saloon keepers of this section intend to go out of the business when the new license law goes into effect, as the rate is too high.  [all are +]
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Np217-222 open

Np223 CCH March 17, 1885 
A Card of Thanks.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium-wide margins.]
         ____
     The thanks of the Coquille City Brass and String Band are due and hereby tendered those who kindly assisted them in their entertainment here last Saturday night.  The success of the same is largely due them, and we feel under lasting obligations for their kindness.
                                     C. C. B. &. S. B. [sic]  [+ text]

Np223 CCH March 17, 1885 
A wish that was granted.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; margins nearly like paragraph indent.]
          ____
LE GARCON.  [centered, not bold; smaller type.]
          ____
     Oh! Sarah, dear, pray lend an ear
       To both us chaps; ‘tis certain
     That we’ll get moonstruck sleeping here
       Without a window curtain.  [+ text.]

Np223 CCH March 17, 1885 
BORN.  In Coquille City March 13th, to the wife of Thomas A. Walker, a son.  [+ text.]  

Np223 CCH March 17, 1885 
Flax Seed.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; wide margins.]
    ____
     The unusually large wheat crop of the current year and the consequent [sic] low and unsatisfactory prices obtained for it have caused many farmers of the North west [sic] to consider the advisability of diversifying their crops in order to secure more profitable returns.  The St. Paul Pioneer Press, in commenting upon this movement,gives [sic] some figures showing the advantages to be derived from planting flaxseed [sic].  Of the total estimated crop of 9,000,000 bushels which will be produced this year nearly one-half will be produced in Dakota and Minnesota.  The sudden rise in importance of this crop shows that of late years the question of diversified crops has become an important factor in the Northwest, and the only wonder is that this particular crop has been so long neglected in view of the fact that flax is better adapted to the climate and soil of that section than any crop other than wheat.  The flax plants of that section yieles [sic] more abundantly than at the East, the number of bushels to the acre produced here about the same as wheat.  As the price this year has remained steady at $1.15 per bushel, with yield of eighteen bushels to the acre, the fact that flax is a good crop to plant in place of wheat admits of no question.  The oil cake product of  the linseed oil mill at St.  Paul is disposed of entirely to the men west of Chicago.  With the extension of facilities of utilizing the products of the flax plant the addition of many manufacturing interests to this section would be only a question of time.  +
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Np224 CCH March 17, 1885 
BEET SUGAR.  [head, centered, bold, smaller than text; medium? margins.]
        ____
      On the 20th ult  [sic; 2 spaces, but no period] in the United States senate, on motion of Senator Plumb of Kansas, the appropriation for the cultivation of sorghum was increased from $20,000 to $50,000.  Sorgham [sic] is one of the chief products of Kansas, which manufactured in 1883 274,000 pounds of sugar from that plant. The rest of the United States produced that year 442,000 pounds.  In 1883-84 the Alvarado beet-sugar factory, in this State, produced 1,250,000 pounds of sugar, and in this same year it has already produced 2,000,000 pounds and will produce 3,000,000 more before the season expires.  Yet we have yet [sic] to hear of any appropriation being made for the encouragement of that industry. It all depends on the quality of the senators whom a State sends to Washington.  Plumb is an active, energetic man, who is always looking out for the interests of his State. [sic]  Of our own senators, Farley is no one knows where [sic] and Miller is probably looking after Alaska.
     Professor Wiley of the United States Board of Agriculture stated on his recent visit to California that this State was capable of producing 700,000 tons of beetroot [sic] sugar per annum.  “If, as the Alvaredo factory reports, it is going to produce this year 2500 tons of refined sugar, ten such factories would produce 25,000 tons, and twenty such factories would produce nearly as much sugar as we are now receiving from Hawaii.  That such factories would be established if the industry received the same encouragement as Plumb has secured for the sorghum industry and as the Hawaiian treaty grants to the Sandwich Island planters, there can hardly be a doubt.  In 1880-81 the total production of beetroot sugar in Europe was 1,749,515 tons, and large importations [sic] of cane sugar were required to meet the consumption.  In 1881-85 the European production of beetroot sugar will not be less than 2,400,000 tons, and Germany has a large surplus for export.  We should, it seems, follow as sensible an example.  –Chronicle.  +

Np224 CCH March 17, 1885 
STILL AHEAD!  AND DON’T YOU FORGET IT -   The people of the Coquille river should bear in mind, that as good Photographs as can be obtained on the Pacific coast, are made by G. H. RAMSDELL, of Myrtle Point.  Will soon have completed a floating ART PALACE  with which  e [sic] will visit every point on the river between Myrtle Point and Bandon, and be prepared to do San Francisco work at less than San Francisco prices.  Will be fully prepared to make Pictures in all styles known to the art, from the smallest Gem to a Photograph 17 x 27 inches.  All he asks is for people to compare his work with that of others.
     Mr. R. has become a permanent citizen of Coos County [sic], and it is to the interest of the people to patronize home industry and thereby keep the money in the country [sic; no period] 
[+ text.]
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[M. note, 2008.  This document contains most of the data from these issues except for some outside news and national-fillers (boilerplate).  Repeat-display-ads are generally not listed more than once in the year.]

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